Certain STIs can be prevented by vaccination.

SHiP offers vaccination against hepatitis A, hepatitis B and Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) to people who are at higher risk of contracting these viruses through sexual contact.

We also offer advice on vaccination for people living with HIV.

Hepatitis A vaccination

Hepatitis A is a virus that causes inflammation of the liver. This can make you jaundiced (skin turn yellow) and feel unwell for a few weeks. The vast majority of people recover fully but slowly within a few weeks.

The virus can be found in the faeces (poo) of somebody who has the infection, and is transmitted through contaminated food and water as well as through oral sex.

At SHiP Derriford Hospital we offer vaccination against Hepatitis A which protects you for more than 10 years. It involves a small injection in the arm, repeated after 6 months.

If you think you might have Hepatitis A or might be at risk of it, please come and see us or call us on 01752 431804, or your GP.

Hepatitis B vaccination

Hepatitis B is a virus that causes inflammation of the liver. This can make you jaundiced (skin turn yellow) and feel unwell. In a third of cases it can become chronic with the potential to cause liver failure and liver cancer.

The virus is spread through blood and bodily fluids, usually through unprotected sex (in the same way as HIV, syphilis and Hepatitis C).

The best way to avoid Hepatitis B is to use condoms.

At SHiP Derriford Hospital we offer vaccination against Hepatitis B which protects you for more than 10 years. It involves a small injection in the arm, repeated up to 3 times over a year. It is important to complete the course of injections to achieve protection.

If you think you might have hepatitis B or might be at risk of it, please come and see us or call us on 01752 431804.

Hepatitis C (no vaccine)

There is no vaccination for Hepatitis C.

Hepatitis is a virus that causes inflammation of the liver. This can make you jaundiced (skin turn yellow) and feel unwell. In more than half of cases it can become chronic with the potential to cause liver failure and liver cancer.

The virus is spread through blood and bodily fluids, usually through unprotected sex (in the same way as HIV, syphilis and Hepatitis B).

The best way to avoid Hepatitis C is to use condoms.

At SHiP Derriford Hospital we can offer a blood test for Hepatitis C. Treatment is also available.

If you think you might have hepatitis C or might be at risk of it, please come and see us or call us on 01752 431804.

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)

HPV are a family of low- and high-risk viruses associated with genital warts (‘low risk’ HPV) and cancers including cervical, anal and throat cancers (‘high risk’ HPV).

It is extremely rare for warts to become cancerous. This is because the HPVs which cause most warts (HPV 6 and 11) are ‘low risk’ viruses

Girls are vaccinated against ‘high risk’ as well as many ‘low risk’ HPV strains through a national vaccination program in schools. This protects against cancers as well as warts. Vaccinating girls indirectly helps protect their male partners too.

Routine cervical screening (sometimes known as a ‘cervical smear test’) starts for all women at the age of 25. This is a test, usually done at your GP every 3 years, that looks for early pre-cancer changes in the cervix so that it can be treated and cured.

Men who have sex with men (MSM) are now offered the HPV vaccine through sexual health clinics like SHiP Derriford Hospital, up to the age of 45. This helps protect against both genital warts and ‘high risk’ HPV cancers and is especially important for those MSM with multiple partners or those living with HIV. 

Vaccinations for people living with HIV

People living with HIV benefit from additional vaccinations. If you are under our care we will discuss this with you.