If you have been diagnosed with an STI yourself, or if someone you have had sex with has, we realise this can be an anxious time. 

STIs are highly contagious and sexual partners of someone who has an STI must be tested and treated as soon as possible, even if they have no symptoms.

For each STI, the way we deal with partners can be different. The information available on this page explains what to do if you have come into contact with any of the common STIs. 

Thrush (candida) infections and Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) are not sexually transmitted infections.

Advice for sexual partners of people with the following STIs:

Non-Specific Urethritis (NSU) / Epidydimitis

We need to see you at SHiP to give you treatment, whether you have symptoms or not. Please do not have sex until this treatment has been completed – this means no sex of any kind, even with a condom, and no oral sex. More information on NSU and epididymitis.

Cervicitis/Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

We need to see you at SHiP to give you treatment, whether you have symptoms or not. Please do not have sex until this treatment has been completed – this means no sex of any kind, even with a condom, and no oral sex. More information on PID.

 

Chlamydia or Mycoplasma genitalium

You need to have tests, whether you have symptoms or not. We may need to give you treatment.

Please do not have sex until this treatment has been completed – this means no sex of any kind, even with a condom, and no oral sex. More information on chlamydia.

 

Gonorrhoea

We need to see you at SHiP Derriford Hospital for tests, whether you have symptoms or not. We may need to give you treatment. Please do not have sex until this treatment has been completed – this means no sex of any kind, even with a condom, and no oral sex. More information on gonorrhoea.

Syphilis

We need to see you at SHiP Derriford Hospital for tests, whether you have symptoms or not. We may need to give you treatment. Please do not have sex until 2 weeks after this treatment has been completed – this means no sex even with a condom, and no oral sex. More information on syphilis.

HIV

We need to see you at SHiP Derriford Hospital. Please see our HIV Testing page.

If you think you have been exposed to HIV within the last 72 hours, we need to see you at SHiP at Derriford Hospital to discuss offering you HIV medication called PEP that can reduce your risk of being infected after exposure – please call us immediately to make an appointment, or attend an Emergency Department outside clinic hours.

More information on HIV.

Hepatitis A, B or C

Please make an appointment to see us at SHiP Derriford Hospital to discuss prevention and treatment.

More information on Hepatitis A
More information on Hepatitis B
More information on Hepatitis C

Information about vaccinations for Hepatitis A and B can be found on our vaccinations page. 

Trichomonas Vaginalis (TV)

We need to see you to discuss giving you treatment, whether you have symptoms or not.Please do not have sex until this treatment has been completed – this means no sex of any kind, even with a condom, and no oral sex. More information on TV.

Genital Herpes (Herpes Simplex Virus, HSV)

Herpes can be highly contagious. If your partner has been diagnosed with herpes, please read the links below or come and see us to discuss. If you have symptoms that you think are related to Herpes (painful genital blisters or sores), we can test for this in clinic and offer treatment.  Please make an appointment to see us as soon as possible. If there is no blister or sore, we cannot test for herpes.

More information on herpes, or call us to speak to one of our health advisers on 01752 431804. The herpes association is another excellent source of information, advice and support.

Genital Warts (Human Papilloma Virus, HPV)

If you think you can see or feel warts in your genital area, please call us to make an appointment for diagnosis and treatment. If you have no warts, there is no test available to see if you are carrying the HPV virus.

It is extremely rare for warts to become cancerous. This is because the HPVs which cause most warts (HPV 6 and 11) are ‘low-risk’ viruses.

More information on warts and HPV.