Anyone who has sex can get a sexually transmitted infection (STI).

The best way of avoiding an STI is always to use a condom or both getting tested before having sex with any new partners.

This ‘STIs’ section also includes pages designed to help if you have been diagnosed with an STI, or have had sex with someone who has. 

You can have an STI without having any symptoms – this means you don’t feel anything is unusual or wrong with you.

On the other hand, you may have symptoms which are of concern to you. Please come and see us in clinic if this is the case.

Common male symptoms
  • Discharge (fluid) from tip of the penis (not urine or semen)
  • Pain when peeing
  • Rash or redness
  • Painful sores or blisters
  • Itching
  • Testicular pain
  • Lumps and bumps
  • Blood in the urine or semen
Common female symptoms
  • Increased discharge (leakage from the vagina)
  • Pain when peeing
  • Rash or redness
  • Painful sores or blisters
  • Itching
  • Pain during or after sex (in the vagina or deeper pelvic pain)
  • Bleeding or blood spotting during or after sex

 

For general information about STIs, please visit the NHS website.